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Scout Builds Monument to Veterans Killed in War on Terror

The ongoing War on Terror has claimed the lives of many U.S. soldiers, and during a recent Memorial Day ceremony, one Scout wanted to make sure these veterans who had lost their lives in the War on Terror would never be forgotten.

Scout Builds Monument to Veterans Killed in War on Terror
Scout David G. speaks at a Memorial Day service. (photo: WRAL News)

Scout David G. of the Boy Scouts of America Occoneechee Council knows firsthand how the War on Terror has had an impact on American lives. His own brother, a Marine, was killed while serving in Afghanistan in 2011. Losing his brother left an indelible mark on David’s own life, and it spurred him to make his own life count for something important.

When it came time to complete an Eagle Scout project, David knew the right choice was to construct a monument in his city so that all of those veterans who were killed in the War on Terror, like his brother, would be remembered.

Their names, etched forever in granite, provide a permanent reminder of the sacrifice of those men and women and the daily sacrifice experienced by the loved ones they’ve left behind.

David also made sure that the monument to these veterans of the War on Terror would provide not just names, but a powerful visual representation, as well – the face of his brother – etched in the monument and looking back at all who come to pay their respects to the veterans.

David said that he hopes the monument continues to serve as a place where the people of his city can come and recognize the sacrifice of their fellow citizens.

To learn more about David’s Eagle Scout project, be sure to read the full article on WRAL.com.

To learn more about the positive impact that Scouting can have on young people like David, be sure to check out this article on the recent Tufts study, and watch this video:

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